Posts from the ‘Member Spotlight’ category

Join us in June for Zipper Pouches!

When: Saturday, June 25, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Where: Sewfinity, 800 S Industry Way Ste 360, Meridian
What: The meeting will feature Marilyn Shake in the Member Spotlight and making zipper pouches.

We’ll be making zipper pouches to donate to two local organizations: Faces of Hope Victim Center and Community Outreach Behavioral Services (COBS). We’re asking you to help make the pouches following this simple tutorial by Noodelhead (or if you have an equally simple pouch pattern, you’re welcome to make that), and then we’ll fill the pouches with personal care items, donated by local businesses. The Noodlehead medium pouch (check here for cutting info) is a versatile size and perfect for our inserts. BMQ is supplying zippers and interfacing — and we need you to bring your fabric, sewing machine and your quilty selves to help make it all come together!

What to bring:

  • your sewing machine & tools (irons, ironing boards and cutting mats are provided by Sewfinity)
  • fabric (if you want to get a jump start, cut 2 pieces of exterior fabric and 2 pieces of lining to 9“ x 12”)
  • you can use one piece of fabric for the exterior, or maybe get creative and piece something to a finished size of 9“ x 12”

Apryl Gardner has graciously agreed to lead us in a pouch-making tutorial at the meeting, along with Cathy Rogers’ own bag-making tips. They’ve both made loads of professional-grade pouches, bags and purses, so have first-hand expertise in this area. Our goal is to make 30-40 pouches in this initial effort. If members are interested in continuing the project, we can add it to our ongoing community giving activities.

We hope to see you soon!

Member Spotlight: Marilyn Shake

Marilyn is a prolific quilter and enthusiastic member of our Guild. Be sure to scroll down for photos of Marilyn’s handiwork.

How did you first get involved with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Marilyn: My good friend Laura Pukstas suggested we attend a meeting and join. I usually do what Laura suggests so I joined. I’m very happy that I did because I have met so many interesting people.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Marilyn: When I was in the 6th grade, I received a Barbie doll and a canopy bed for her. I decided she needed a new bedspread and canopy topper so I got on the bus in Waterloo, Iowa and rode it to J.C. Penney to buy some fabric. I had never used a sewing machine but how hard could it be. My dad helped me with the threading and away I went. When it was time to add “puffiness” to the quilt I didn’t know what to use so I went downstairs to the dryer and cleaned out the dryer lint for the batting. I still have the quilt the topper, and canopy bed.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Marilyn: When I was in high school my mother suggested we make a quilt out of the leftover fabric from dresses I had made. My mother sewed up the whole quilt and had the ladies at church tie the quilt. There were a few blocks leftover that I recently made into 2 table runners for my daughters. Both of my daughters love the quilt that my mom made.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Marilyn: Whatever I find interesting at the moment. I do like a challenge, it’s hard for me to make the same block over and over again; sampler quilts are a favorite.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Marilyn: I love bright colors, blues and greens, oranges and reds, nothing drab. Tula Pink and Elizabeth Hartman fabrics are my favorites. I enjoy using Kona when it comes to solids.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Marilyn: My dear friend Laura has had a definite impact on my choices – she pushes me to try new things.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Marilyn: I enjoy putting weird fabric on the back of quilts – skeletons on the back of a floral for example.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Marilyn: I might be taking a nap or having a glass of wine.

What are you working on now?
Marilyn: Currently I’m working on Moda Blockheads every Wednesday, a row-by-row quilt using Bonnie and Camille patterns, finishing a quilt top that contains hand embroidered blocks from the 1930s, to name a few.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Marilyn: I want to make a double wedding ring using new technology. Still hopeful.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Marilyn: My oldest UFO is about 30 years old. It’s made from mostly JoAnn’s fabrics before I knew about real quilt shops.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Marilyn: I always have a mug of water by my side, I snack on something crunchy like pretzels or crackers, Starburst jelly beans, a glass of wine…

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Marilyn: I have a tv in my studio so I turn it on – HGTV, Lifetime, Hallmark, anything mindless. Sometimes I put on an old movie. I recently had on True Lies, and The Tourist.

Feb. Meeting: Mini Sew Day & Paint Chip Challenge Swap

We’re in person for our next meeting!

When: Saturday, Feb. 26, 10 a.m. – noon (stay until 2 p.m. if you want to keep sewing)

Where: Main Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., William F. Hayes Memorial Auditorium (first floor), Boise (Please note: Everyone over age two, regardless of vaccination status, must wear a face mask inside all Boise Public Library locations, including inside meeting and study rooms.)

  • Bring your swap: If you participated in the Paint Chip Challenge and swap, bring your mini quilt to hand off to your swap partner! If you can’t be there, consider getting your quilt to someone who can deliver it on your behalf.
  • Sew some hearts: Let’s make some simple heart bocks to use in a Get ‘er Done community quilt. The heart fabric is provided — just bring your whites for background (any white will do — including white on white, low-volume prints, solids, etc) and your sewing machine. We’ll plan on making 6-inch blocks using this pattern from Cluck Cluck Sew and then bordering each heart with a 2-inch strips of white. Copies of the pattern will be available at the meeting, or check it out ahead of time.
  • Wear your mask: We’ll be inside, and we want to help everyone stay healthy!

We hope to see you on the 26th! In the meantime, be sure to check out our latest Member Spotlight featuring original Sister of the Hex Shelly Harshman.

Member Spotlight: Shelly Harshman

Our resident Sister of the Hex Shelly Harshman is in the Member Spotlight. She’s a long-serving member of the BMQG board, where she oversees all things Membership related. Shelly is quick-humored, and an accomplished quilter with a terrific eye for color.

How did you first get involved with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Shelly: I was looking for a smaller, more modern group to join. When I did a Google search, I was impressed with the colorful logo and the information about this group. I came to a meeting, and felt really welcome.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Shelly: My mom paid me to make summer shorts for my little sisters when I was around 12. I sewed all my skirts and blouses and dresses while I was in school. My mom was always sewing, and it’s been a part of my life as long as I can remember.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Shelly: My sisters and I made hexi quilts together. That will probably always be my favorite project. Sisters of the Hex rule!!

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Shelly: I love color, and trying something new. A pattern is just a place to start.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Shelly: I love bright jewel tones, and super scrappy quilts – loads of surprising details to find. Curved blocks are a current favorite. I love a quilt pattern that you have to look at for a while to figure out how they put it together. I’m always up for a challenge.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Shelly: My mom was always sewing, but she’s not a quilter. I thought everybody had matching clothes and pajamas for their dolls. I learned my sewing skills from her. My Grandma Spencer was a quilter and I have wonderful memories of her hand quilting on wooden frames on the covered back patio at her home. Sadly, she passed away before I caught the quilting bug.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Shelly: Hmmm…. I’ve kissed the Blarney Stone and I drive a Mini Cooper.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Shelly: I don’t understand the question.

What are you working on now?
Shelly: I’m free motion quilting the backlog of quilt tops that are hanging in my closet. I use my home machine to quilt them. I try to always have something to plan, something to piece, and something to quilt, and some handwork. I received a Featherweight for Christmas this year, and I’ve been loving piecing on it!

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Shelly: I want to make the La Passacaglia quilt. So far, I have a nice big pinterest board with ideas, and have ordered the book and papers.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Shelly: I’m currently pretty caught up – I have quilt tops that need to be quilted, but the oldest is probably only a couple of years old. Covid has given me more time to work on projects.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Shelly: Dr. Pepper and peanut m&m’s.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Shelly: I love audiobooks and music. Movies on the iPad distract me unless it’s something I’ve seen a bunch of times. Mysteries and Clive Cussler adventures are favorites.

Member Spotlight: Millissa Masters

We’re featuring Millissa Masters in this month’s Member Spotlight and to the BMQG Board, where she’ll serve as our new Secretary. Since she joined BMQG, Millissa jumped in with both feet and we’re so glad she did!

How did you first got involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Millissa: I first got involved with BMQG through the suggestion of Linda Jolly. We were at a Boise Basin Quilt Guild meeting, talking about groups and I took her recommendation to heart. Here I am!

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Millissa: Moon Kitty, which I loved creating as my first attempt at an Ann Brauer inspired piece. Besides, it won a Judge’s Choice ribbon at the last Boise Basin Quilt Show.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Millissa: My quilting style/ aesthetic is what I would describe as boundaryless. Is that a word? I’m one to always want to learn new techniques and play with scraps which will turn into who knows what.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Millissa: Colors/ shapes and fabrics in my designs?? Ha! Everything!! No seriously everything!!

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Millissa: I was originally introduced to quilting by a 90+ year old neighbor, Mary, in Redmond, OR during 2009. We only were there 6 months out of the year, but we played in her garden, and she transformed the way I looked at fabric and color. She was a kick in the pants old gal and loved the strong bright colors, which definitely encouraged my direction in color choice.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Millissa: Not sure, but I am a thrift store, antique junkie who loves estate sales, yard sales and old junk shops.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Millissa: When not quilting I love to play in the kitchen, baking & cooking. Or playing with the kitties who keep me on my toes.

What are you working on now?
Millissa: Now, I’m working on 5 different projects at the same time. Just a little scattered??

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Millissa: There are many in my head that I haven’t gotten down on paper, and they keep coming.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Millissa: Its somewhere at the bottom of one of my piles and its so old I can’t remember what it is!!!! HAHAHA

Member Spotlight: Kathy Stockton

We’re welcoming Kathy Stockton to the BMQG Board, where she’ll serve as our new Treasurer. In addition to the skills she brings to the board, Kathy’s sense of humor means she’s plain fun to be around.

How did you first get involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Kathy: I became involved with the Boise Modern Quilt Guild through a friend from a quilting class. She invited me to a meeting and told me all about how modern quilting was so freeing, that there were no rules! Of course, she was wrong. There are always rules. Because my sister was heavily involved with the Boise Basin Quilters Guild, and I wanted to be involved with a quilting group separate from my sister, I decided to join the Boise Modern Quilt Guild, even if there are rules to modern quilting. I joined in the fall of 2012.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Kathy: My mother taught me how to sew in grade school and I did NOT enjoy garment sewing. Her mother and grandmother (my grandmother and great-grandmother) both made quilts, and that was what I wanted to do, but my mother was not supportive. This was back when garment sewing was a way to save money, so it was encouraged. I made my first quilt (tied) in my junior high home economics class, and gave it to my sister for Christmas.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Kathy: I started a quilt made from primary colors for a grand-nephew and decided that I wanted to keep it, which I did. I had fallen in love with the fabrics and the backing fabric. I entered it at the Western Idaho Fair and won a first place blue ribbon. Now I can’t even use that quilt since it’s an award-winning – with the ribbon firmly attached – quilt!

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Kathy: I like using patterns but when I have fabrics that I like together, I have been known to design my own quilt. If I find a pattern I like, I will make that quilt until I get tired of the design. I like the idea of triangles more than the execution of triangles. Because I have my quilts finished by my long-arm quilter, I have learned that a smaller quilt is less expensive to quilt, so I mostly make lap size or twin size quilts, although I will make larger quilts for special occasions, like weddings or graduations.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Kathy: I basically do my own thing, which is apparently purchasing fabric. HA! I enjoy bright fabrics but sometimes I am drawn to colors that aren’t nearly that bright, which always surprised me. I am drawn to Alexander Henry fabrics although lately I’m finding that there actually are other designers out there that I like. My sister is drawn to very different fabrics, generally more subdued colors, and I am constantly amazed that we have such different tastes.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Kathy: The two people that have influenced my quilting the most are Teri Brown and my quilter, Ronald. Teri convinced me to buy a Bernina Quilters Edition sewing machine, and I began taking classes at Quilt Crossing, including her Project Runway class, where you worked on any garment or quilting project, and she was there to help you. One of the classes I took was Ronald’s Open Sewing class, and that class gave me the time and confidence to branch out to designing my own quilts rather than just buying kits. That class and his help more than anything else helped me to become the quilter I am today.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Kathy: I generally give away every quilt I make and also have given away my left kidney.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Kathy: I should say organizing my fabric or cleaning my house, but probably reading books or watching television with my husband. I also sing with the Boise Phil Master Chorale and play violin in the Serenata community orchestra.

What are you working on now?
Kathy: I tend to work on one project at a time unless something intervenes like a wedding quilt or other time-sensitive project. I am starting back on a quilt I am making for my husband’s oldest niece and her husband. It is a kit I bought over 2 years ago and have everything cut out. I’m to the part where I have to make half-square triangles.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Kathy: I started digitizing all my parents’ slides into a digital format over 10 years ago. There must be 30 or 40 boxes with about 100 slides in each box. I have a contraption that allows me to upload 4 slides at a time. I do intend to get back to this project, but after I scan all my printed photos and upload those for my daughter-in-law.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Kathy: I generally finish one project before I start another one, but I do have some pillow cases that I started back in 2010. The idea was to make pillowcases to go with the wedding quilt I made for my son and daughter-in-law. Someday I will finish them.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Kathy: I try not to eat anything when I am quilting or sewing, but I always have a glass of water. Not very exciting, but keeps me hydrated. And if I spill water, it’s not a big deal.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Kathy: Because I tend to listen rather than watch, I like to “watch” shows that I have seen before. I recently finished re-watching all the seasons of Downton Abbey. I also like to “watch” silly shows that don’t require my full attention, such as Brooklyn 99, or Corner Gas. I’ve seen all the Corner Gas episodes but will start over at the beginning because they are pretty funny. If you haven’t seen Corner Gas, I highly recommend it. It’s a Canadian television show set in Saskatchewan, and is available on IMDB television or I have all the DVDs if anyone would like to borrow them. I also enjoy Spongebob Squarepants.

Member Spotlight: Nancy England

Nancy England is in the Member Spotlight this month and many of you may already know Nancy well. She’s been a long-time member of BMQG and is a prolific quilter who donates an impressive number of quilts to the community.

How did you first got involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Nancy: Friends were going so I checked it out the website and thought I would try it.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Nancy: When I was around 9 years old, my mom got me started sewing, first simple things (tablecloths etc.) and then on to sewing clothing.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Nancy: I have enjoyed trying new things as modern quilt projects, but my favorite classes have been mystery quilts.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Nancy: I think I gravitate toward traditional quilt blocks. But I am finishing up a block of the week quilt that Linda Jolly got me started on. It is traditional block with a modern twist, put together by Amanda Carye.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to?
Nancy: I have not real strong preference.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Nancy: A quilt group was started at BSU in the late 1990s and the people in the group really got me hooked on quilting. There were a lot of different backgrounds and experience with quilting.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Nancy: I was very athletic in high school and college and meet my husband in gymnastics class.

What are you working on now?
Nancy: I do yoga, read, garden, knit and crochet and always spend to much time on social media.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Nancy: Hand quilt a whole cloth quilt. (Just white fabric with and elaborate quilt design.)

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Nancy: I took a beginning star class at Quilt Crossing from DuAnn Wright in 1995 or 1996 and have never finished it, probably because I used fabric I had, which was calicos.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you are sewing?
Nancy: I usually have a cup of tea at my elbow.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing?
Nancy: I usually have the TV on to the Game Show network, or classical music or rock and roll music.

Do you have any recommendations to share?
Nancy: Measure twice, cut once. Read the directions through all the way before you start.

Member Spotlight: Elizabeth Schneider

Our Member Spotlight this time is Elizabeth Schneider. The Spotlight is a way to learn a little about each other and our shared love of quilting. And, each Spotlight member gets time at the next meeting to be, well, in the spotlight and share some of her favorite modern quilts or other works.

How did you first got involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Elizabeth: I got involved in the Boise Modern Quilt Guild after I moved back to Boise in 2020. I had been following the guild on social media before we moved.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Elizabeth: My grandmother made most of my clothes growing up. Once I learned to sew in junior high we would spend about an hour each Sunday morning after church working on one of my garment sewing projects.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Elizabeth: I really enjoyed doing Cinco De Mayo, Karen Stone’s paper piecing project as a block of the month. I had a friend in another state working on it at the same time.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Elizabeth: I think “modern traditional” fits my style. I have done modern, traditional and art quilting.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Elizabeth: I like bright colors. Fabrics include Tula Pink, Valori Wells, Violet Craft, Kaffe Fassett. In terms of shapes I have quite a few house designs plus scrap quilts.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Elizabeth: The guilds I have been a part of have been the biggest influence by whom they bring in as speakers.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Elizabeth: I’m also a musician. I play flute and sing in church choir and play English handbells.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Elizabeth: Too many things! I work part-time writing grants for the Idaho STEM Action Center. I am trying to improve my tennis game. I also make cards. And make music.

What are you working on now?
Elizabeth: I’m working on trying to finish Sue Spargo’s 2020 Block of the Month lite, Chirp. I’m also getting a head start on a graduation gift quilt.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Elizabeth: I want to remake the dress my grandmother wore at my Mom’s wedding in 1961. I have the dress (it’s very cool with a Mad Men vibe) but I’m not her size. I found the Vogue pattern through an online pattern database several years ago and bought it from an Etsy shop for $75!

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Elizabeth: A Dresden Plate wall hanging that I started in 1995. It’s partially machine quilted. The colors are not me.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Elizabeth: Beverages depend on the time of the day and range from coffee or tea to an occasional glass of wine in the evening. I don’t snack while sewing.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Elizabeth: I listen to public radio and depending on time of day it might be classical, jazz, or news. I really like Echoes in the evening.

October Meeting & Paint Chip Challenge

It was the final outdoor meeting of 2021, and we managed to skirt the rain storms for show & tell and news about our Holiday Swap and Challenge.

The Paint Chip Challenge:
• Create a modern mini quilt for your swap partner
• Use only the colors and values (lightness or darkness) represented on the two paint chips you receive from the person you’re making for
• Additionally, you can throw in a pop of a third color; and you can add gray, black or white
• Keep the size small – no bigger than 18” on its longest side
• Your finished piece can be long and skinny, square or any shape you like

How it Works
• Find two paint chips/cards in coordinating colors you love (check your local paint or hardware store)
• Bring your completed mini to the After-Holiday Party on January 22, 2022. It’ll be a fun after-holiday gift exchange! (or if we’re not meeting in person, plan to have your mini delivered by then)

Sign up here and then get your color chips to Darla by November 20, 2021

Show & Tell

Here’s a sampling of what we shared:

  • Nancy Seid stepped into the Member Spotlight, and along with sharing her quilting, we got tips for breaking projects into small, manageable steps that can help get to the finish line. Nancy sees some corollaries between her work with Boise State ADHD students and quilters (go figure!!), and offered several ideas such as setting a timer to help focus attention on one project for a limited amount of time.
  • Millissa let us know about the Oct. 27 Virtual Talk and Tour by Victoria Findlay Wolfe: Now & Then, Playing with Purpose with the Artists. Register here. (It’s free but you have to sign up!)
  • The Get ‘Er Done effort saw some great action this meeting. Millissa spearheaded a leader-ender project during the Day Camp, and then she created two quilt tops. Darla and Cathy took the tops to quilt, and several others took some orphan blocks from our Get ’Er Done pile to make crib quilt tops. Progress!
  • Nancy England showed off her holiday runners and quilt, all of which will be at her church’s bazaar.
  • Betsy completed an art quilt as part of an online class with Laura Wasilowski of artfabrik.com. Betsy used some of Laura’s hand-dyed fabrics for this whimsical fun piece.
  • Karen showed a charming fall wall hanging, another large quilt she described as being made with leftovers from other projects, a huge quilt from Edyta Sitar of Laundry Basket Quilts, and three (!) pieces from an online class with Cindy Grisdela.
  • Lynne showed a modern quilt made of solids, and a large Americana themed quilt
  • Lindsie finished a hearts quilt for a niece, which was quilted by Laura, but had delivered it the week before

 

Member Spotlight: Nancy Seid

Say “hi” to our next member in the spotlight, Nancy Seid. Nancy’s one who joined BMQG during the 2020 shutdown, when Zoom meetings were the thing.

The Spotlight is simply a way to learn a little about each other and our shared love of quilting. And, each Spotlight member gets time at the next meeting to be, well, in the spotlight and share some of her favorite modern quilts or other works.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Nancy: My grandmother gave me sewing cards when I was four, which I worked and worked on. My mother taught me to sew on her Singer Featherweight. I only started quilting a few years ago.

How did you first get involved with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Nancy: My little sister Joanna is a quilter and professional sewist. I thought I wasn’t good enough to join a guild, but she told me how much fun she had and encouraged me to join. I looked at the web page for BMQG and loved the projects and inspiration. Such an active, interesting group to learn from.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Nancy: I gravitate to bright saturated colors, with a white or light gray background. I like bold geometrics with unexpected color combinations. I haven’t made many quilts yet, so I don’t have a particular style or aesthetic yet.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Nancy: My sister is my inspiration. She is a fabric recycler, very creative and artistic. I show her my works in progress and she helps me if I get stuck and is always encouraging.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Nancy: I work at Boise State coordinating academic services for students with disabilities. One thing I do is coaching college students with ADHD. I use techniques for focus and project completion when I am quilting, and inspiration from quilting for the students: visualization of completed projects; “finished is better than perfect.” I am also in a book club and participate in church activities.

What are you working on now?
Nancy: My bear quilt and baby clothes for my 1-year-old granddaughter. Another granddaughter is graduating from high school next May, so she’s going to get a quilt.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Nancy: The half-square triangle quilt has been in process for two years. I did not have the needed precision skills when I started it. The Guild members gave me some ideas on reformatting it.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Nancy: I listen to podcasts: This American Life, Hidden Brain, and Dateline NBC.