The Modern Quilt Guild defines modern quilts as ones that are primarily functional and inspired by modern design. Modern quilters work in different styles and define modern quilting in different ways, but several characteristics often appear which may help identify a modern quilt. These include, but are not limited to: the use of bold colors and prints, high contrast and graphic areas of solid color, improvisational piecing, minimalism, expansive negative space, and alternate grid work. “Modern traditionalism” or the updating of classic quilt designs is also often seen in modern quilting.

The following posts show examples of modern quilting from our members and other modern quilters.

Posts from the ‘Modern Quilting’ category

Member Spotlight: Kathy Stockton

We’re welcoming Kathy Stockton to the BMQG Board, where she’ll serve as our new Treasurer. In addition to the skills she brings to the board, Kathy’s sense of humor means she’s plain fun to be around.

How did you first get involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Kathy: I became involved with the Boise Modern Quilt Guild through a friend from a quilting class. She invited me to a meeting and told me all about how modern quilting was so freeing, that there were no rules! Of course, she was wrong. There are always rules. Because my sister was heavily involved with the Boise Basin Quilters Guild, and I wanted to be involved with a quilting group separate from my sister, I decided to join the Boise Modern Quilt Guild, even if there are rules to modern quilting. I joined in the fall of 2012.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Kathy: My mother taught me how to sew in grade school and I did NOT enjoy garment sewing. Her mother and grandmother (my grandmother and great-grandmother) both made quilts, and that was what I wanted to do, but my mother was not supportive. This was back when garment sewing was a way to save money, so it was encouraged. I made my first quilt (tied) in my junior high home economics class, and gave it to my sister for Christmas.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Kathy: I started a quilt made from primary colors for a grand-nephew and decided that I wanted to keep it, which I did. I had fallen in love with the fabrics and the backing fabric. I entered it at the Western Idaho Fair and won a first place blue ribbon. Now I can’t even use that quilt since it’s an award-winning – with the ribbon firmly attached – quilt!

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Kathy: I like using patterns but when I have fabrics that I like together, I have been known to design my own quilt. If I find a pattern I like, I will make that quilt until I get tired of the design. I like the idea of triangles more than the execution of triangles. Because I have my quilts finished by my long-arm quilter, I have learned that a smaller quilt is less expensive to quilt, so I mostly make lap size or twin size quilts, although I will make larger quilts for special occasions, like weddings or graduations.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Kathy: I basically do my own thing, which is apparently purchasing fabric. HA! I enjoy bright fabrics but sometimes I am drawn to colors that aren’t nearly that bright, which always surprised me. I am drawn to Alexander Henry fabrics although lately I’m finding that there actually are other designers out there that I like. My sister is drawn to very different fabrics, generally more subdued colors, and I am constantly amazed that we have such different tastes.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Kathy: The two people that have influenced my quilting the most are Teri Brown and my quilter, Ronald. Teri convinced me to buy a Bernina Quilters Edition sewing machine, and I began taking classes at Quilt Crossing, including her Project Runway class, where you worked on any garment or quilting project, and she was there to help you. One of the classes I took was Ronald’s Open Sewing class, and that class gave me the time and confidence to branch out to designing my own quilts rather than just buying kits. That class and his help more than anything else helped me to become the quilter I am today.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Kathy: I generally give away every quilt I make and also have given away my left kidney.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Kathy: I should say organizing my fabric or cleaning my house, but probably reading books or watching television with my husband. I also sing with the Boise Phil Master Chorale and play violin in the Serenata community orchestra.

What are you working on now?
Kathy: I tend to work on one project at a time unless something intervenes like a wedding quilt or other time-sensitive project. I am starting back on a quilt I am making for my husband’s oldest niece and her husband. It is a kit I bought over 2 years ago and have everything cut out. I’m to the part where I have to make half-square triangles.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Kathy: I started digitizing all my parents’ slides into a digital format over 10 years ago. There must be 30 or 40 boxes with about 100 slides in each box. I have a contraption that allows me to upload 4 slides at a time. I do intend to get back to this project, but after I scan all my printed photos and upload those for my daughter-in-law.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Kathy: I generally finish one project before I start another one, but I do have some pillow cases that I started back in 2010. The idea was to make pillowcases to go with the wedding quilt I made for my son and daughter-in-law. Someday I will finish them.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Kathy: I try not to eat anything when I am quilting or sewing, but I always have a glass of water. Not very exciting, but keeps me hydrated. And if I spill water, it’s not a big deal.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Kathy: Because I tend to listen rather than watch, I like to “watch” shows that I have seen before. I recently finished re-watching all the seasons of Downton Abbey. I also like to “watch” silly shows that don’t require my full attention, such as Brooklyn 99, or Corner Gas. I’ve seen all the Corner Gas episodes but will start over at the beginning because they are pretty funny. If you haven’t seen Corner Gas, I highly recommend it. It’s a Canadian television show set in Saskatchewan, and is available on IMDB television or I have all the DVDs if anyone would like to borrow them. I also enjoy Spongebob Squarepants.

Paint Chip Challenge Inspiration & Sew Party on Jan. 22

It’s almost time for our all-day sew fest, featuring the paint chip challenge & mini quilt swap, a community heart quilt project, and a salad bar potluck! Please RSVP here so we can plan accordingly. And kindly your mask, regardless of vaccination status, unless you’re actively eating or drinking.

 

When: January 22, 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • You’re welcome to come as early as 8:30 a.m.
  • Come ready to help set up your sewing station when you arrive and put items away before you go.
  • Paint chip challenge swap will be at 11:00 a.m., lunch at noon.

Where: LDS church at 3200 Cassia St., Boise 83705. It’s the same location as our summer quilting day camp, in the same large gym.

Some other things to know:

  • Masks are required while not actively eating.
  • Bring a topping for our lunch salad bar. We’ll also have a snack table if you want to bring anything else to share with others throughout the day.
  • Bring your own refillable water bottle or mug, and we’ll cut down on waste.
  • In the RSVP form, let us know if you can bring things such as your iron, ironing board, etc.

Paint chip challenge: If you’re like some of us and still contemplating what to make for your mini quilt, check out the BMQ Pinterest board or the Seattle Modern Quilt Guild’S board  a little inspiration. Let us know in the RSVP form if you’ll be bringing your swap or need to make other arrangements.

New year, new meeting time: Based on feedback, our Saturday meetings will be moved up to 10 a.m. . We’ll plan to meet inside for upcoming meetings, wear masks regardless of vaccination status, and be in locations with space to spread out (this applies for sew days and shorter meetings alike). When the weather is great and we want to meet out in the park, we’ll do that.

2021 Annual Meeting Recap

Thanks to everyone who joined us for the Annual Meeting and our extended conversation with Daisy Aschehoug of Warm Folk!

Annual Meeting

Here are a few highlights of what we covered:

  • 2021 Recap: Lindsie guided us through a look back at our year. Wow! There BMQG was an active and agile group. Members, check your email for details.
  • Dues: Dues remain at $20/year; renew or join by December 8. It’s easy to pay online! Just go to the Boise Modern Quilt Guild Membership page and use the PayPal option.
  • Board Changes: Welcome to new Board members Millissa Masters, who will serve as Secretary, and Kathy Stockton, Treasurer! We’re thrilled to have the energy and skills these two offer. We’re equally appreciative of outgoing officers Cassie Koerner (Secretary) and Sally Bradley (Treasurer) who helped make the business end of our organization run so well and be so fun.
  • New earlier meeting time: Based on feedback, our Saturday meetings will be moved up to 10 a.m. beginning in early 2022.
  • Meeting locations: We’ll meet inside for upcoming meetings, wear masks regardless of vaccination status, and be in locations with space to spread out (this applies for sew days and shorter meetings alike). When the weather is great and we want to meet out in the park, we’ll do that.
  • Social media: Join BMQG and other members on Instagram! Look for @boisemqg or #boisemqg, and connect with other members between meetings.

 

Show & Tell

Here’s a sampling of what we shared:

  • Yowza, Nancy Seid got a new machine! She said it’s like dating again, getting to know her new Juki, and we’re glad to hear she’s taking it slow.
  • Gwen made the cutest pouch for her granddaughter’s ballet shoes, using Tula Pink fabric that was made for this very thing.
  • Deb showed the rainbow quilt she’s working on for a family member.
  • Marilyn wowed the crowd with her Tula Pink nesting baskets, that just kept on going!
  • Linda Jolly shared her Christmas quilt completed with fabrics from the summer quilt camp raffle.
  • Lindsie demonstrated her true get’er done attitude with an orphan block baby quilt finish.
  • Karen Falvey sprinkled in some Christmas spirit by showcasing her finished presents quilt, fresh from the long armer.
  • Carol impressed everyone with her patience in quilting her striped top.

What’s Ahead

  • December: Enjoy the Holidays! No Club Mod this month or next, but join us in 2022 for an updated Club Mod (hint: money, UFOs and prizes are part of the deal).
  • January 22: After-Holiday Party, Swap & Sew Day (9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.): Join us for an all-day sew fest, featuring the Paint Chip Challenge swap and a salad bar potluck! Watch for details, come ready to help with set up and then get ready for so. much. fun.

Guild T-Shirts Still Available!

If you’re interested in snagging one of those sassy t-shirts passed out at summer Quilting Day Camp, you still have time to order. These seriously soft shirts by JamesAlanTees are designed by our own Lindsie Bergevin. Member only pricing of $30/shirt. Check out options and place your order here.

Member Spotlight: Nancy England

Nancy England is in the Member Spotlight this month and many of you may already know Nancy well. She’s been a long-time member of BMQG and is a prolific quilter who donates an impressive number of quilts to the community.

How did you first got involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Nancy: Friends were going so I checked it out the website and thought I would try it.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Nancy: When I was around 9 years old, my mom got me started sewing, first simple things (tablecloths etc.) and then on to sewing clothing.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Nancy: I have enjoyed trying new things as modern quilt projects, but my favorite classes have been mystery quilts.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Nancy: I think I gravitate toward traditional quilt blocks. But I am finishing up a block of the week quilt that Linda Jolly got me started on. It is traditional block with a modern twist, put together by Amanda Carye.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to?
Nancy: I have not real strong preference.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Nancy: A quilt group was started at BSU in the late 1990s and the people in the group really got me hooked on quilting. There were a lot of different backgrounds and experience with quilting.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Nancy: I was very athletic in high school and college and meet my husband in gymnastics class.

What are you working on now?
Nancy: I do yoga, read, garden, knit and crochet and always spend to much time on social media.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Nancy: Hand quilt a whole cloth quilt. (Just white fabric with and elaborate quilt design.)

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Nancy: I took a beginning star class at Quilt Crossing from DuAnn Wright in 1995 or 1996 and have never finished it, probably because I used fabric I had, which was calicos.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you are sewing?
Nancy: I usually have a cup of tea at my elbow.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing?
Nancy: I usually have the TV on to the Game Show network, or classical music or rock and roll music.

Do you have any recommendations to share?
Nancy: Measure twice, cut once. Read the directions through all the way before you start.

Member Spotlight: Elizabeth Schneider

Our Member Spotlight this time is Elizabeth Schneider. The Spotlight is a way to learn a little about each other and our shared love of quilting. And, each Spotlight member gets time at the next meeting to be, well, in the spotlight and share some of her favorite modern quilts or other works.

How did you first got involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Elizabeth: I got involved in the Boise Modern Quilt Guild after I moved back to Boise in 2020. I had been following the guild on social media before we moved.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Elizabeth: My grandmother made most of my clothes growing up. Once I learned to sew in junior high we would spend about an hour each Sunday morning after church working on one of my garment sewing projects.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Elizabeth: I really enjoyed doing Cinco De Mayo, Karen Stone’s paper piecing project as a block of the month. I had a friend in another state working on it at the same time.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Elizabeth: I think “modern traditional” fits my style. I have done modern, traditional and art quilting.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Elizabeth: I like bright colors. Fabrics include Tula Pink, Valori Wells, Violet Craft, Kaffe Fassett. In terms of shapes I have quite a few house designs plus scrap quilts.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Elizabeth: The guilds I have been a part of have been the biggest influence by whom they bring in as speakers.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Elizabeth: I’m also a musician. I play flute and sing in church choir and play English handbells.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Elizabeth: Too many things! I work part-time writing grants for the Idaho STEM Action Center. I am trying to improve my tennis game. I also make cards. And make music.

What are you working on now?
Elizabeth: I’m working on trying to finish Sue Spargo’s 2020 Block of the Month lite, Chirp. I’m also getting a head start on a graduation gift quilt.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Elizabeth: I want to remake the dress my grandmother wore at my Mom’s wedding in 1961. I have the dress (it’s very cool with a Mad Men vibe) but I’m not her size. I found the Vogue pattern through an online pattern database several years ago and bought it from an Etsy shop for $75!

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Elizabeth: A Dresden Plate wall hanging that I started in 1995. It’s partially machine quilted. The colors are not me.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Elizabeth: Beverages depend on the time of the day and range from coffee or tea to an occasional glass of wine in the evening. I don’t snack while sewing.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Elizabeth: I listen to public radio and depending on time of day it might be classical, jazz, or news. I really like Echoes in the evening.

October Meeting & Paint Chip Challenge

It was the final outdoor meeting of 2021, and we managed to skirt the rain storms for show & tell and news about our Holiday Swap and Challenge.

The Paint Chip Challenge:
• Create a modern mini quilt for your swap partner
• Use only the colors and values (lightness or darkness) represented on the two paint chips you receive from the person you’re making for
• Additionally, you can throw in a pop of a third color; and you can add gray, black or white
• Keep the size small – no bigger than 18” on its longest side
• Your finished piece can be long and skinny, square or any shape you like

How it Works
• Find two paint chips/cards in coordinating colors you love (check your local paint or hardware store)
• Bring your completed mini to the After-Holiday Party on January 22, 2022. It’ll be a fun after-holiday gift exchange! (or if we’re not meeting in person, plan to have your mini delivered by then)

Sign up here and then get your color chips to Darla by November 20, 2021

Show & Tell

Here’s a sampling of what we shared:

  • Nancy Seid stepped into the Member Spotlight, and along with sharing her quilting, we got tips for breaking projects into small, manageable steps that can help get to the finish line. Nancy sees some corollaries between her work with Boise State ADHD students and quilters (go figure!!), and offered several ideas such as setting a timer to help focus attention on one project for a limited amount of time.
  • Millissa let us know about the Oct. 27 Virtual Talk and Tour by Victoria Findlay Wolfe: Now & Then, Playing with Purpose with the Artists. Register here. (It’s free but you have to sign up!)
  • The Get ‘Er Done effort saw some great action this meeting. Millissa spearheaded a leader-ender project during the Day Camp, and then she created two quilt tops. Darla and Cathy took the tops to quilt, and several others took some orphan blocks from our Get ’Er Done pile to make crib quilt tops. Progress!
  • Nancy England showed off her holiday runners and quilt, all of which will be at her church’s bazaar.
  • Betsy completed an art quilt as part of an online class with Laura Wasilowski of artfabrik.com. Betsy used some of Laura’s hand-dyed fabrics for this whimsical fun piece.
  • Karen showed a charming fall wall hanging, another large quilt she described as being made with leftovers from other projects, a huge quilt from Edyta Sitar of Laundry Basket Quilts, and three (!) pieces from an online class with Cindy Grisdela.
  • Lynne showed a modern quilt made of solids, and a large Americana themed quilt
  • Lindsie finished a hearts quilt for a niece, which was quilted by Laura, but had delivered it the week before

 

Member Spotlight: Nancy Seid

Say “hi” to our next member in the spotlight, Nancy Seid. Nancy’s one who joined BMQG during the 2020 shutdown, when Zoom meetings were the thing.

The Spotlight is simply a way to learn a little about each other and our shared love of quilting. And, each Spotlight member gets time at the next meeting to be, well, in the spotlight and share some of her favorite modern quilts or other works.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Nancy: My grandmother gave me sewing cards when I was four, which I worked and worked on. My mother taught me to sew on her Singer Featherweight. I only started quilting a few years ago.

How did you first get involved with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Nancy: My little sister Joanna is a quilter and professional sewist. I thought I wasn’t good enough to join a guild, but she told me how much fun she had and encouraged me to join. I looked at the web page for BMQG and loved the projects and inspiration. Such an active, interesting group to learn from.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Nancy: I gravitate to bright saturated colors, with a white or light gray background. I like bold geometrics with unexpected color combinations. I haven’t made many quilts yet, so I don’t have a particular style or aesthetic yet.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Nancy: My sister is my inspiration. She is a fabric recycler, very creative and artistic. I show her my works in progress and she helps me if I get stuck and is always encouraging.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Nancy: I work at Boise State coordinating academic services for students with disabilities. One thing I do is coaching college students with ADHD. I use techniques for focus and project completion when I am quilting, and inspiration from quilting for the students: visualization of completed projects; “finished is better than perfect.” I am also in a book club and participate in church activities.

What are you working on now?
Nancy: My bear quilt and baby clothes for my 1-year-old granddaughter. Another granddaughter is graduating from high school next May, so she’s going to get a quilt.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Nancy: The half-square triangle quilt has been in process for two years. I did not have the needed precision skills when I started it. The Guild members gave me some ideas on reformatting it.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Nancy: I listen to podcasts: This American Life, Hidden Brain, and Dateline NBC.

September Meeting was just rosey

The Rose Garden at Juila Davis Park was a perfect backdrop for our September meeting, and Halloween fabric (and candy!) put us in the fall mood.

Fall-Winter Schedule
We spent some time discussing meeting format in the coming months. Based on comments at the meeting, we’ll plan for a combination of in-person meetings, held outside (weather permitting), indoors in a large room with space to socially distance (think a large meeting room at the library, or a church multi-purpose room), and likely some virtual meetings on Zoom. Here’s the schedule for the next few months:

  • October 8: Club Mod on Zoom (7-9 p.m.)
  • October 23: Monthly Meeting in Person (1-3 p.m.)
  • November 12: Club Mod on Zoom (7-9 p.m.)
  • December 4: Annual Meeting on Zoom(1-3 p.m.)
  • December 10: Club Mod on Zoom (7-9 p.m.)
  • January 22: After-Holiday Swap (1-3 p.m.)

Show and tell
Possibly the favorite part of our meeting….? Here’s a sampling of what we shared (see details below photos):

  • As the feature of our Member Spotlight, Cathy Rogers kicked things off. Her love of all things Tula showed up in the quilt that graces her living room couch, where we suspect she reads some of the 34 books she’s working towards reading this year. (So far she’s at 30!).
  • Nancy E. showed a hexi ornament she made based on what she saw in McCall’s Quilting magazine November/December 2021 issue, and a scrappy pattern she bought on a road trip to the Stitch n’ Snip in Crouch.
  • Lindsie finished binding one of the Sisters of the Hex quilts.
  • Robin joined us for the first time and showed the quilt she made from a kit, featuring Kaffe Fasset wovens
  • Terri worked on knitting socks, while Kathy S. couldn’t help but show off her designer orange bag
  • Karen decided to make some really small hexis, and then wondered what to do with them… here’s what she ended up with!
  • Marilyn got serious about finishing projects this year, and it shows! She showed a jelly roll quilt; an orange quilt that started as a kit purchased in 2010 with Kaffe Fasset prints; a Halloween wall hanging started in 2009; and a skull quilt using Tim Holtz fabric purchased years ago at Salli’s Back Porch Fabric Store in Shoshone. And then! she stunned us with a quilt commissioned by a family member, using a photo of a landscape for color inspiration, and design inspired by Denyse Schmidt.
  • Elizabeth completed two Bonnie Hunter quilts: Appalachian Autumn and a round-robin style Unity quilt (which was sewn mostly from Elizabeth’s stash! Impressive)
  • Linda brought candy (!!) and her completed Bats and Boos mystery quilt from FatQuarter Shop.

Sept. Member Spotlight: Cathy Rogers

This month, we’re featuring Cathy Rogers in the Member Spotlight series. The Spotlight is simply a way to learn a little about each other and our shared love of quilting. And, each Spotlight member gets time at the next meeting to be, well, in the spotlight and share some of her favorite modern quilts or other works.

How did you first get involved in with Boise Modern Quilt Guild?
Cathy: I read about Quilt Con (Austin, Texas in 2013) in one of my quilting magazines and wanted to go and in order to go, I needed to be a member of a modern quilt guild. I talked to my quilting friends and learned about the Boise Modern Quilt Guild and joined.

What’s your first memory of something related to quilting or sewing?
Cathy: My mom always sewed clothes, costumes, etc. when I was growing up but I had no interest in learning how to sew. In my early 30’s, a friend from book club wanted to take a beginning quilt class at Quilt Crossing and asked me if I wanted to go. I said yes, even though I did not own a sewing machine. The teacher taught the class using plastic templates and urged us to use our non-dominant foot to push the pedal, consequently I push the pedal with my left foot to this day.

I was (partially) hooked and bought a sewing machine. After the class was over, I worked on the quilt on my own and then lost interest – my first of many UFO’s. A year or so later, I wanted to make some Christmas gifts and asked my dear friend Darla Christiansen for assistance. She came over and helped me and which made me think that sewing had more to offer than templates. Another friend, Marcia Howard, told me of a beginning quilt class taught by a couple of her friends – Gwen Smith and Teresa Church – that would provide different quilting techniques. I took the class and that truly was the beginning of my quilting love and provided a quilting community.

What’s your most memorable, or favorite, quilting project?
Cathy: I took a paper piecing class at Country Quilter to learn paper piecing. The pattern we worked on was “Christmas Pickle.” I loved the pattern and really like paper piecing. However, I didn’t realize when I started that the quilt had 120 pinwheels. My friend Denise talked our other friends into having a sew day where we all worked on my pinwheels. I finished the quilt and it’s my favorite quilt, not only because of its aesthetic but also knowing all the wonderful friends who helped make it.

How would you describe your quilting design style or aesthetic?
Cathy: I really like modern quilts and have grown to love various modern fabric designers – Tula Pink especially. I also appreciate the philosophy of the modern quilt movement with promoting diversity and inclusion in quilting and art. I still quilt some traditional quilts occasionally, trying to honor quilting history. I believe my aesthetic is evolving. Most of my modern quilts are not scrappy or improvisational but I am drawn to those types of quilts. I need to break out of my safe zone and take the plunge. One of my favorite quilts is “Urban Legend” which has buildings divided into morning, noon, and night segments. I made the quilt using my scraps and grunge fabric and love the result.

What colors, shapes, fabrics do you gravitate to? What do you use most in your designs?
Cathy: I love purple. I also like grunge fabric and anything Tula Pink. I just saw a new designer – William Reue – that I’m really excited about. I have made several Elizabeth Hartman quilts and love the results. I don’t have a signature shape but am drawn to lines more than curves.

Is there someone or something that has influenced your quilting?
Cathy: I took a classes from Amy Butler, Denyse Schmidt, Jean Wells, and Susan Carlson. All of these women are inspiring and nudged me out of my safe zone into a more artistic mind set. Of course, my quilting friends influence me continuously and I feel blessed the have them in my life.

What might someone be surprised to know about you?
Cathy: I’m the tiniest bit obsessed with the Walt Longmire book series. I have read them all at least twice. They are my “go to” books when I feel like I just need to seep, like a tea bag in hot water.

What do you do when you aren’t quilting?
Cathy: I love all things books. I have a reading goal each year, this year is 34 books. I listen to “What Should I Read Next” podcast, and am a member of the Cabin and enjoy attending the Readings and Conversations guest author series each year. I also love live theater, although I haven’t done much of that recently but will again. Also, I hone my trivia skills daily through Alexa’s Jeopardy! app.

What are you working on now?
Cathy: I’m working on a bag “A Place for Everything” by annie.com using Tula Pink’s line of fabric Alice in Wonderland. I am also sewing a paper pieced block of the month series by Whole Quilt Studio.

What’s the project that you always intended to do (quilting or otherwise) but haven’t yet?
Cathy: I have black and white fabrics that I really want to make something with but have not found the right pattern yet.

What’s the longest-lasting UFO in your collection?
Cathy: I have fabric for a Blooming Nine Patch that I must have bought over 20 years ago that I haven’t touched since then.

Do you have a preferred snack or beverage while you’re sewing? If so, what is it?
Cathy: Good and Plenty.

What do you listen to or watch while you’re sewing? Do you have any recommendations to share?
Cathy: I love to listen to audible books while I sew. In addition to the Walt Longmire series, I also am listing to the Louise Penny series. My overall favorite listens are “A Brutal Telling”, “A Cold Dish”, “The City We Became”, “Almost Sisters”, “The Dry”, “11/22/63”, and “A Gentleman in Moscow.”

August Meeting Recap

It was great being in the park for our August meeting and thanks to everyone for finding their way to a new location. A special welcome to new members, and thanks to Lynne Crawford for stepping into the Member Spotlight! We loved seeing Lynne’s quilts and other handiwork.

Announcements & Upcoming Events

  • Sept. 11 Quilt Walk: Gather up those quilts you’ve been making and get ready to show them off at our inaugural Modern Quilt Walk in the park on Sept. 11. The Quilt Walk is an informal way to share the art of modern quilting in an easily accessible location — and to capitalize on greenbelt foot traffic expected at Art in the Park that same weekend.
    • If you’re thinking about participating, let us know by completing this form.
    • We’re celebrating modern quilting — and other handiwork (whatever you’re making and proud of!). Our quilts will be front and center, but you’re also welcome to bring other items (e.g., bags, works in progress) that show the range of things we all make.
    • Read more here and watch your email for additional details as we get closer.
  • Club Mod: We’ll take a break for September as we’ll be on the eve of the Quilt Walk (see more below), and then you’re invited to join the Friday night sew party at Club Mod, October 8, 7-9 p.m. on Zoom. Sew on your projects, chair dance at your machine, and maybe win a prize!

Show and tell
Possibly the favorite part of our meeting….? Here’s a sampling of what we shared (scroll down for details):

  • Delanie designed and worked on this Baby Birch Quilt at the July Quilting Day Camp.
  • Millissa spearheaded a leader-ender project that we could all sew on during the Day Camp. She created a design that uses scraps to make a modern, vibrant quilt.
  • Jeri showed her Center Point quilt by Elise Lea for Robert Kaufman. She also assembled orphan blocks from Artisans for Hope and Darla pieced the back. It’s off to Gwen for quilting and will eventually be returned to Artisans to sell.
  • Apryl is in a mood for minis! She’s making fabric collage postcards (aiming for 100) and the Hamilton mini is for her daughter.
  • Gwen had a few bits of stripes and polka dot fabrics that she’s turned into a bright and cheery quilt.
  • Cathy R. quilted the three (three!) Sisters of the Hex quilts. Thanks in advance to Betsy, Cassie and Lindsie for finishing the binding.
  • Ginny showed off her giant log cabin Ray Quilt by Carolyn Friedlander.
  • Kathy S. made this donuts-and-coffee themed quilt for her husband.
  • Betsy showed off her very scrappy, very beautiful Japanese X block. You can find tutorials and patterns on Pinterest, and here’s just one example of what you’ll find.
  • Nancy S. showed her Bee Sweet pattern with bear fabric from Hobby Lobby
  • Fay made a Christmas quilt with the bundle of winnings from July’s Day Camp raffle
  • Linda is getting ready for fall with Bats and Boos, a mystery quilt from the FatQuarter Shop.
  • Lindsie shared the 2022 Quilter’s Planner that she helped design again this year. You can check out the customizable planner made just for quilters at QuiltersPlanner.com (and a tip from Lindsie: pre-sales end Tuesday, Aug. 31, so if you get your order in today, you’ll get the clip-in bookmarks bundle for free).

Hope you see you at the Quilt Walk on Sept. 11!